Cross-Border Data

Let the (non-personal) data run free

Let the (non-personal) data run free

Yesterday, the Council of the European Union, under the guidance of the Estonian Presidency, agreed on a common position on the Draft regulation on the free flow of non-personal data in the EU. The regulation aims at banning “data localization” and removing barriers to the free movement of data across borders. 

The free-flow of data is fundamental to a vibrant digital economy. Impediments which restrict the flow of data across borders create fragmented and inefficient markets without scale economies, stifle innovation, limit competition, and drive up consumer costs.

Data in the Fragmented Global Marketplace

Data in the Fragmented Global Marketplace

Tech knows the future of business is digital, and that digital means global. Entrepreneurs and developers make concepts a reality, refine software, and launch new products all within the digital space. But what about when your customer base expands beyond your home country's market, or your data enters the cloud? ill you even notice? How does your existing and new consumer data cross borders, and what regulations guide this expansion? What happens if you just do nothing? (For more on this, see our news item on the EU GDPR from a US perspective)

Good News: EU-US Privacy Shield gets European Commission’s green light

Good News: EU-US Privacy Shield gets European Commission’s green light

On Wednesday 18 October, the European Commission published a report supporting the continuation of the EU-US Privacy Shield agreement and recommending some improvements. The report concludes the negotiations of the data-transfer deal's inaugural annual review, which the Alliance previously covered here.