Android Chronicles: From Walled Gardens to Gardens Run Amok

Once again, government breaks everything it touches

You may have seen the announcement from Google on the new Android rules (and our formal press release). With the EU government-driven deadline looming, the plan for the Android ecosystem has been released. It’s less than ideal for developers, but there’s at least some hope.

You’ll remember the situation: complaints came in to sympathetic regulators asking for less restrictive licensing of the Android OS, and for greater freedom on pre-loaded apps. The government agreed and asked for changes. Google is now telling us how it plans to comply.

On Android licensing, the plan is to free device manufacturers to use the OS in its pure Google form or to allow forked variants. The tradeoff is that licenses will no longer be free. On preloaded apps, Google will also eliminate license terms requiring its suite of services to be installed, and shift to a paid license for various combinations with search and browser capabilities being treated uniquely. You can read more about these options on Google’s web page and in the press.

For developers, the obvious impact will be the emergence of Android forks - meaning more product variants and more help desk calls. Over and above this, we can expect handset prices to rise and pressure on app developers to help support the rising cost of deployment. More costs, and a smaller, more complex market. Not good.

On the helpful side, Google is only going to allow the “Android” label on its own version of the OS. This should reduce consumer confusion. However, we all know that people will try and run “Android complaint” apps on non-Android OSs, and that device makers will encourage them with claims that systems they sell are compatible. It’s going to be confusing while things shake out.

For those of you that already have hugely popular titles, expect to get some love from rival device makers looking to bring you into their ecosystem. For those still working on that first big breakthrough, expect things to break frequently as the market fragments.

The next round of this game will take place in court, where Google is still challenging the rules that are forcing the new model. The Developers Alliance is hopeful that the concerns of developers will be aired as the two sides square off.

Rest assured we’ll tell anyone that will listen these two things: that platform fragmentation has costs throughout the ecosystem, and that developers are among those most impacted by this ham-handed regulation.


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Bruce Gustafson
President & CEO

The Specter of Fragmentation is Back

Google’s compliance with the European Commission’s decision on the Android antitrust case risks increasing market fragmentation and costs for developers and consumers

Contact: Michela Palladino - michela@developersalliance.org

 

Brussels – App developers and publishers are an economic engine in Europe and globally. In support of the two million Europeans whose jobs and livelihoods are intertwined with the App Economy, the Developers Alliance is closely following today’s announcement regarding how Google will comply with the European Commission’s Android decision.

The Commission’s decision challenged clauses in Google’s Android licenses. As Bruce Gustafson – President and CEO of the Developers Alliance – explained in July, these clauses have led to an open and accessible platform, which “has strongly benefited developers and consumers over the years.  Thanks to market stability and reduced costs, developers have been able to focus on bringing new and innovative products to consumers.” 

The Alliance understands that Google plans to comply by altering contractual requirements in its partner agreements while seeking to maintain an open and attractive Android ecosystem.  As required by the decision, Google will allow its partner phone makers to develop phones in the EEA based on incompatible versions of Android while also selling similar handsets using compatible versions.  

Google’s compliance with the decision raises anew the specter of fragmentation. There is a risk that diverging versions of Android will lead to devices where apps don’t work for users. Developers may also need to do costly rewrites of apps for multiple incompatible versions. Google’s efforts to limit this sort of fragmentation have led to a better platform for users, developers, and phone makers.

The Developers Alliance hopes that clear labelling will help to reduce the potential for user confusion between compatible and incompatible Android devices.  


Developers are Battling for User Privacy. All They Need Is Some Help

Enough with the blame game already

I’m getting tired of waking up to headlines of another major data security gap. The whole internet economy is getting tired of it. Big platforms, ISPs, regulators, politicians; everyone agrees that something’s broken and that we need to fix it. Where the discussion stalls is on the details, the responsibilities, and the distributed burden that we’ve all got to share - and of course on who’s at fault.

Too often the group that takes the blame are developers. This is likely because they lack the power or the unified voice to plead their own case and fight back. The irony, of course, is that developers are some of the few actually doing anything about this problem. So let me be clear from the start: all the developers I know share your focus on privacy and security, and they are keenly aware of how a few bad actors are destroying their image, their livelihood, and their profession.

This was the impetus that led to the founding of the Developers Trust Alliance, a developer-initiated project that helps users identify trusted developers and educates developers on how to build better privacy controls into their projects. It is no wonder then that developers are frustrated that while they focus on fixing the problems, the ecosystem around them focuses on circling the wagons and leaving them on the outside with the wolves.

Developers are directly responsible for everything we love about the digital economy. Before Facebook, or Google, or Amazon, developers were crafting software to empower us, entertain us, educate us, improve our businesses, and raise our quality of life. Developers - not ISPs or platforms - are the true source of innovation and entrepreneurship that makes the internet great. They are not faceless corporations or mad scientists, but your friends and neighbors and coworkers. Developers are like you and the average people that you meet on the street every day. They care about what you care about - except then they write software to make what we all care about a little bit better.

Developers have every incentive to behave as good citizens and safeguard user data. Incentives matter.  People won’t use apps and services they don’t trust, let alone pay for them. An app that doesn’t get used doesn’t make money. (We like to joke that the term for a developer that doesn’t make money is ‘grad student’).

To the extent that developers ask you to share data with them, it’s almost always to allow them to build something better and more valuable. Developers use shared data to innovate and delight, and to improve their ability to do those over and over again. Developers get rich by creating something users value, not by stealing your data for some nefarious purpose.

It is both unhelpful and unfair when developers get singled out as villains in any data security gap. While developers are free to ask users to share data with them directly, the recent issues have often arisen from platforms that accidentally made available user data they themselves held - via developer tools they themselves provided! While no user data was actually accessed, and developers respected the rules, developers were still mentioned as if they’re the problem. The result is that real people, real businesses, and real futures are being impacted because platforms were lax in how they built the tools they encouraged developers to use.

What our industry needs is a system-wide focus on solving the very real privacy problem. It’s not enough to talk about principles - though that is valuable. What we need now are both goals and action. There are plenty of simple things that can be done today to improve security and transparency. There’s no need to wait. What would help is for the biggest players to empower the developer community in this common fight, rather than needlessly shift the blame.


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Bruce Gustafson
President & CEO

Announcing the Developers Trust Alliance

The world of data is evolving; from how it's collected, used, managed, and stored to the user-developer relationship. There's a gap between what consumers think is happening with their data, or what they read in the news when there's a breach or hack, and what measures developers are actually taking to ensure security, transparency, and the responsible use of data.

We are proud to announce the launch of the Developers Trust Alliance, a special project of the Developers Alliance. Our mission is to offer developers a set of principles and best practices that promote user trust; and to educate consumers and those outside of the developer community about the different types of data and how data is used.

Commit to adopting the best practices and show it to the world. Are you a developer and want to commit to following the Developers Trust Alliance Best Practices on data? Once you make the commitment, we'll share an icon for your website or app and add you to the Trusted Developers list on our website.

Why should developers join the DTA? Because it’s what consumers are looking for. We surveyed 500 U.S.-based consumers over the summer to ask them about their confidence in developers when it comes to transparency and securing the data that they are asked to share.

  • 83% of users agree that developers should follow best practices on informing users what data they want them to share and how they are using it.

  • 89% of users say it is important to them that developers clearly tell you what data they want them to share and how they're using it. 53% say it is "extremely" important.

  • 79% of users say they more likely to visit a website or download an app if they are clearly told what data they are being asked to share with them and how it will be used.

We are proud to announce our first follower: MedlMobile. President Dave Swartz explains why he was honored to be the first company to sign on board in this blog post.

After a board meeting of the Developers Alliance back in early 2018, a few of us discussed the (then) coming GDPR requirements - and how they would impact developers here in the U.S. The sense was that eventually, the U.S. would follow in Europe’s footsteps - and because of the political uncertainty, those regulations could take a number of directions. 

In an effort to lead that direction to a place that we believe best works for developers, development and innovation - while also protecting our privacy and data as citizens - we undertook to get out ahead of government regulation by creating a grassroots program that the Developers Alliance could spearhead.

Interested in learning more? Check out the DTA Website here: www.developerstrustalliance.org.

Interested in adopting the best practices and becoming a trusted developer? Start the application process here: https://www.developerstrustalliance.org/get-involved/

Watch this space for more updates.

I miss Android already

Once upon a time, there were nothing but “walled gardens.” For those of you that don’t go back that far, the term refers to smartphone app stores before Google Play and Apple’s App Store were a thing. Back then the phones weren’t very smart, and the stores, phones, and apps were tied to a single mobile operator. You chose an operator, picked something from their dedicated, but limited, phone catalogue, and then lived inside a tiny ecosystem walled off from your friends and colleagues who occupied the garden next door (with different apps but similar frustrations). At least you could make a phone call or pay to send a text.

These pre-Android days weren’t great for developers either. Developers too were confined to walled gardens and small, fragmented markets.

Luckily, the tech marketplace is a highly dynamic and competitive space, and in the decade that followed, phones and mobile operating systems matured and the walls began to come down. We can probably thank the iPhone for this – and a closed smartphone ecosystem where the app store was tied to the device hardware and the operating system, not the operator. The phones were great, the apps terrific, and unless an operator offered the device, the subscribers didn’t come. Operators had no choice but to open the gate and let the iPhone (and eventually Android devices) in.

The end of the walled garden was a blessing for the developers writing the software and building all the great apps to come. Instead of writing and rewriting code to operate on dozens of incompatible devices and operating systems, they could focus on their core application. Instead of trying to create a user market from a mosaic of app, device, and operating system versions, they could rely on the influence of Apple and Google to tame the operator ecosystem, limit fragmentation, and provide access to billions of users while only coding for a few operating system variants. It’s been a golden age for software innovation and consumer choice.

Unfortunately, the golden era is likely to fade away when the European Commission announces its decision on the ongoing Android competition case. The fear is that the EC might decide, in an inappropriate analogy to their old Microsoft analysis, that Google must stop using the Android platform as a tool to promote its own applications. While there’s no such thing as a perfect market or perfect competition, the Android model is more about aggressive marketing than it is about competitive barriers. Consumers want a basic suite of apps preloaded on their devices. Device makers deliver the Google apps alongside as many others as they want. Google’s promotion of its own app portfolio creates little fear with developers, since we know from our own research that consumers consistently add and use multiple apps for core functions, right alongside those that come with their device. Developers weight the benefits of a stable and competitive ecosystem well above any marketing challenge of sharing screen space with Google (as they indicated by their write-in support for Android). In fact, it would be odd for the company that supports the ecosystem to somehow be disadvantaged because of it. There are few examples left of markets where partners don’t also happily compete with each other. So the question must be asked, does EC intervention actually improve things?

For developers, the likely result is the return of the fragmented marketplace. Applications will differ across not just Apple’s IOS and Android devices (one scenario is Google adopting Apple’s vertically integrated hardware/software model), but the likely proliferation of new hardware/software pairings from each of the world’s largest device makers. Developers will feel pressure to specialize by segment or market, since developing for every platform is costly and choosing one over another is risky. Not every platform, and not every developer, will survive. The era of the independent developer is likely fading as well, as competing platforms seek to lock-in the most popular apps and features. It’s ironic, but the future looks surprisingly like the past, with the gardens now belonging to the device makers and not the operators.

Developers are accustomed to a dynamic marketplace, and I have no doubt they will adapt. While the EU has been focusing attention on smartphones, the market has moved on to IoT, digital assistants, “skills” alongside apps, voice interfaces, and the growing complexity of AI and industrial automation – areas where regulators still have much to learn. It’s hard for a regulator to keep up with a competitive market. Like the personal computer market, eventually two or three device ecosystems will settle into place as the world moves on and the smartphone era is eclipsed by the next big thing. I only hope that we can learn from the process, and make the industry transitions easier, rather than harder, for this wave and the next, and the next.

 

This piece has been published:
In Italy by Le Formiche: Perché sento già la mancanza di Android
In Spain by el Economista: Android, ya te echo de menos


Bruce Headshot.png


Bruce Gustafson
President & CEO